You can bake it, broil it, sauté it, pan-sear it, blacken it or throw it on the grill. Personally, I prefer to cook it on the grill to smoky fruit wood coals along with some sweet bell peppers and red onions, but you do what you want. If your trout is dry, don’t blame it on the fish – you’ve overcooked it. If you have trouble with fish sticking to the grill when you barbecue, make sure that the grate is clean and hot. The fish is much more likely to stick to a grill that is not very hot. If that still doesn’t work, dust the fish with a little seasoned flour before grilling. If that doesn’t work, give up and put the fish under the broiler.

To butterfly your trout, use a sharp boning knife and, starting at the head, run the knife between both sides and the spine. This will separate the bones from the spine and fish can be opened up flat. After cooking, the bones can be easily removed.

Trout with Herb Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • 4 one pound trout weight after cleaning, head-on, butterflied
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • pinch salt
  • 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh herbs chopped

Instructions

  • Season fish with salt and pepper. Combine remaining ingredients in a jar with a tight-fitting lid and shake vigorously. Baste the fish with the stuff in the jar and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Place fish, skin-side down on a medium heat barbecue. Cover with lid or foil for 5 minutes, baste again and give the fish a quarter turn with a spatula. Cover again and cook for 5 minutes more. Fish should be done throughout. Remove bones and serve with vinaigrette on the side.

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